[caption id="attachment_422" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Central Fairmount School"][/caption]
By: Julie Kelly
When I started my series, Cincinnati, the City of Seven Hills, I had no idea one of the original hills was Fairmount. I've lived in Cincinnati most of my life (on the east side) and I don't remember ever hearing the name, Fairmount. Apparently, Fairmount is a small area in the west part of Cincinnati, located between Glenway Avenue (to the South) and Western Northern Boulevard (to the North). And, it is subdivided into North Fairmount and South Fairmount. When I told a friend I was writing about Fairmount, he said, "Why buy one house in Hyde Park when you can buy a dozen for the same price in Fairmount?" After thinking about what he said, I decided to put his comment to the test, and here's what I learned…

November 18, 2010 Article Written/Published by: Cincinnati Area Board of Realtors Waiting for Bottom If you’re one of the would-be homebuyers telling your REALTOR® you want to buy…but are waiting for home prices to hit bottom, you might want to rethink your strategy. In theory, it seems like a good idea to “go for the low,” but history has shown it’s next to impossible to do. Even experienced stock market investors have difficulty recognizing when a market has bottomed out. Read on…

BY: Julie Kelly [caption id="attachment_397" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Walnut Hills"][/caption] Learning about the original "seven hills" of Cincinnati has been a fascinating journey. This week, I am tackling the neighborhood of Walnut Hills.  While researching Walnut Hills, I came across a couple of things I didn't already know... The first thing I learned, is that Walnut Hills is widely known for its cemetery. The cemetery opened in 1843 and filled up rapidly over the next forty years with victims of the cholera epidemics of the mid 1800's. It was originally called the "Second German Protestant Cemetery" but today it is known simply as the "Walnut Hills Cemetery". There are 50,000 grave sites in the cemetery. It was closed to new burials in 1864. Every year in October , WEBN, a local Cincinnati radio station, holds a 5k marathon that winds through the cemetery called "Run Like Hell." The proceeds from the race go to help the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

[caption id="attachment_372" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Row Houses in Mount Auburn"][/caption] By: Julie Kelly For second part of my series on the original "seven hills" of Cincinnati, I chose to feature Mount Auburn. Growing up outside of Cincinnati in a little country town, I always got excited when we traveled downtown. It didn't matter if we were going to the doctor or just passing through to go to the Cincinnati Zoo, I particularly loved driving through Mount Auburn just to look at all the magnificent architecture and feel the history that fills the air. It is an area rich in architectural history. The most notable styles of homes in the neighborhood include; Federal, Greek Revival, Victorian and Georgian Revival. Charles Dickens was quoted as saying,  "I was quite charmed with the appearance of the town, and its adjoining suburb of Mount Auburn: from which the city, lying in an amphitheatre of hills, forms a picture of remarkable beauty, and is seen to great advantage."